NOSTALGIE CRIME BOARD
22. September 2017, 20:58:24 *
Willkommen Gast. Bitte einloggen oder registrieren.

Einloggen mit Benutzername, Passwort und Sitzungslänge
 

  Fanpage   Übersicht   Hilfe Suche Kalender Einloggen Registrieren  
Trauerbanner Robert Vaughn
NCB MUSIKBOX Facebook Link Facebook Link Meine anderen Foren und Homepages
Seiten: [1] 2
  Drucken  
Autor Thema: Kavanagh QC (UK, 1995-2001)  (Gelesen 2181 mal) Durchschnittliche Bewertung: 5
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« am: 03. Dezember 2013, 17:35:11 »



Kavanagh QC ist eine ITV Serie, die von 1995-2001 lief. Insgesamt gab es 27 Folgen. John Thaw spielt hier den "Barrister" (Rechtsanwalt) James Kavanagh, der sich aus einfachsten Verhältnissen hochgearbeitet hat.

Als die Serie begann lief ja John Thaw's grossartige Serie "Morse" noch. Man kann einige Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen beiden entdecken. Aber, anders als Morse, ist Kavanagh  ein verheirateter Familienvater mit 2 Teenager-Kindern, was ihm natürlich schwer zu schaffen macht.

Gleich in der 1.Folge tritt ein noch junger Ewan McGregor als Angeklagter auf, der als Student in den Ferien "auf dem Bau" arbeitet, obwohl sein Vater ein schwerreicher Mann ist. "Das wäre charakterbildend" meint der Vater. Nun der Charakter des Jungen scheint es nötig zu haben, denn er wird angeklagt, seine Arbeitgeberin vergewaltigt zu haben. Dieser Fall nimmt eine überraschende Wendung.

Es treten immer wieder sehr bekannte Schauspieler in Gastrollen auf. In Folge 3 z.B wird Dougray Scott (was der damals noch für eine lächerliche Frisur hatte zwinkern ) des Kindesmissbrauchs verdächtigt. Auch hier gibt es am Schluß eine ungewöhnliche Wendung.


Ich habe mir kürzlich auf amazon.co.uk die Komplettbox gekauft: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kavanagh-Q-C-The-Complete-Collection/dp/B002EAKWE8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386086573&sr=8-1&keywords=kavanagh+qc+complete+collection

Erstens weil ich ein großer John Thaw Fan bin (das war mit seine letzte Rolle bevor er 2002 starb) und zweitens, weil ich die britischen Gerichtsserien liebe. Im wahren Leben will ich mit Rechtsanwälten nichts zu tun haben, aber ich liebe es, wenn die Briten so herrlich altmodisch mit ihren "Whigs" Perücken in den alten Gerichtsäalen ihre Fälle verhandeln. Vor 2 Jahren habe ich mir ja schon die ebenfalls klasse Serie "Judge John Deed" mit Martin Shaw als Judge gekauft.

Mir gefällt Kavanagh QC ausgezeichnet und es gibt 4 Sterne.

Auf youtube gibt es sehr viele Folgen in voller Länge. Hier mal die Pilotfolge "Nothing but the truth" mit Ewan Mc Gregor

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37gKgO9Usa0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37gKgO9Usa0</a>


edit: Schockiert warum sind denn die amazon-verlinkten Grafiken immer so groß? Sorry
« Letzte Änderung: 03. Dezember 2013, 17:44:40 von wbohm » Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« Antworten #1 am: 03. Dezember 2013, 17:40:16 »

Hier mal der komplette Episodenführer (Quelle: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Kavanagh_QC_episodes)



Series 1

1. "Nothing but the Truth" (3 January 1995)

    Successful but over-worked barrister James Kavanagh defends David Armstrong, played by Ewan MacGregor, a Cambridge student of impeccable background who is accused of rape by Eve Kendall, played by Alison Steadman, the wife of his employer. Eve's husband Alan is having an affair and she is lonely, which, at first sight, makes her seem to be a fantasist fabricating a consentual happening, which is Kavanagh 's line of defence. However he also has to face the fact that his wife Lizzie, upset by her husband's workaholism, is having an affair with a colleague.

2. "Heartland" (10 January 1995)

    In Sunderland a young former car thief is run over by a local vigilante, leaving him brain damaged. His mother asks Kavanagh to take on the case despite lack of sufficient evidence.

3. "A Family Affair" (17 January 1995)

    Michael Duggan has received an eight-month sentence for kidnapping his own son. Kavanagh defended him and now Duggan's ex-wife and her new husband are seeking a court order banning all contact between him and the child. The case takes a turn when Duggan reveals to his solicitor that the boy's stepfather is abusing him. In a separate case, Kavanagh is prosecuting a pornographer whose defence is that her work is art. At home, Kavanagh faces the inevitable when daughter Kate wants her boyfriend to spend the night. In Chambers, Aldermarten considers running for Parliament and asks a special favor from Julia.

4. "The Sweetest Thing" (24 January 1995)

    Kavanagh defends Annie Lewis, a high class prostitute accused of killing an entrepreneur who had a reputation for being a risk-taker and who regularly enjoyed the company of paid escorts. Annie claims she is innocent and refuses a plea bargain offered by the prosecution. The defence challenges the testimony of witnesses who claim to have seen her leaving the hotel just prior to the murder, though she claims to have left several hours before. On the home front, Kavanagh is concerned about the future of his marriage when he learns Lizzie may get a senior level civil service appointment in Strasbourg and daughter Kate, who is about to leave for university, is having boyfriend problems. In Chambers, Jeremy is at his chauvinistic best when he initially refuses Julia's request to play in the annual cricket match.

Series 2

1. "True Commitment" (26 February 1996)

    Kavanagh finds himself defending a left-leaning protester accused of stabbing a skinhead at a protest march. The accused claims that it was entirely his fault, but when he hears that his upper middle class girlfriend has shopped him to the police, he changes his story saying he was just being chivalrous and that it was his girlfriend who did the stabbing. The Kavanaghs continue their commuter marriage with Lizzie working in Strasbourg and it all proves to be a challenge to them both. Kate has left for Cambridge and Lizzie is pleased to hear that her tutor is the husband of one of her closest childhood friends. She is far less pleased when she learns that her daughter and the tutor are having an affair and Kavanagh himself simply blows a gasket. And has Jeremy found true love at last?

2. "Men of Substance" (4 March 1996)

    Kavanagh finds himself prosecuting a case for HM Customs. The case is anything but straightforward however. While 15 kilos of heroin was seized being smuggled in condemned meat, there is no physical or forensic evidence linking the drugs to any of the accused. One of them, Kevin Gregson, may have eliminated a witness in a previous case and he seems true to form when Kavanagh and his wife are threatened. Kavanagh suspects that not all is on the up an and as far as the evidence is concerned.

3. "The Burning Deck" (11 March 1996) Rupert Penry-Jones plays a naval lieutenant accused of arson.

    Kavanagh defends Lt. Ralph Kinross RN accused of starting a fire in a barracks. His co-accused is Jones, a childhood friend who is a sailor in the same unit, who had loaned money to the sailor whose bed was set on fire. Kavanagh's colleague Eleanor Harker QC is defending Jones but is also having problems at home. The defence focuses on the role of Chief Evans, the senior rating in charge of the engineering department, who was also Jones' main tormentor. In Chambers, Julia receives a proposal of marriage but has only a very short time to make up her mind.

4. "A Sense of Loss" (19 March 1996)

    Kavanagh defends a teenage boy accused of shooting dead a policewoman. The boy confessed to the police but is pleading 'not guilty' but refuses to help Kavanagh with his defence.

5. "A Stranger in the Family" (25 March 1996)

    An industrial accident at a recycling plant leaves a young man mentally and physically impaired. Kavanagh goes to court to secure a fair settlement from the insurance company for the family.

6. "Job Satisfaction" (2 April 1996)

    Kavanagh faces the most complex case of his career: a man and his sister appear to have murdered their father, a farmer, and his second wife.

Series 3

1. "Mute of Malice" (3 March 1997)

    Kavanagh defends a murder suspect found to be mute of malice.

    Kavanagh's defence of an army chaplain accused of killing his brother is made all the more difficult by the fact that his client refuses to speak. Is he simply being uncooperative, or has the trauma of service in Bosnia rendered him mute? Meanwhile, Aldermarten faces traumas of his own when the judge involved in his case has a nervous breakdown.

2. "Blood Money" (10 March 1997)

    Kavanagh prosecutes a doctor accused of medical malpractice because she left the operating room when the patient developed a fatal complication.

    When her husband dies in the operating theatre following a car crash, Sarah Meadows believes there is a case of negligence. With Jeremy Aldermarten representing the hospital, Kavanagh agrees to take on her case, despite his misgivings as to the likelihood of winning. The surgeon left the theatre before closure, but at a point when the patient was doing well. In Chambers, Kavanagh is asked to speak to one of his colleagues over her behavior. At home Kavanagh and his wife are disappointed when son Matt fails his A-level exams.

3. "Ancient History" (17 March 1997)

    Kavanagh prosecutes an apparently blameless family doctor in an unprecedented war crimes trial and finds himself wondering about the fallibility of human memory after fifty years. The court hears devastating testimony, as victims of Nazi atrocities relive their experiences of concentration camps. Kavanagh asks his son to do some research.

4. "Diplomatic Baggage" (24 March 1997)

    Natasha Jackson is the daughter of the UK's ambassador-designate to Austria, Sir Alan Jackson. She is charged with murder in the death of Lisa Aeurbach, a journalist. Natasha's defence is that the woman was dead when she arrived for an interview. The case takes an interesting twist when Kavanagh, who is defending Natasha, is approached by a mysterious government official whose only concern is to keep HM's ambassador-designate as far away from scandal as possible. Matt decides to move out on his own and his parents are surprised to learn he's sharing a flat with two attractive young women. In Chambers, Peter Foxcott takes an interest in an old friend he has not seen for many years.

5. "The Ties That Bind" (7 April 1997)

    Kavanagh agrees to take on a private prosecution against Ian Vincent who is believed to have beaten 17-year old Graham Foster to death for having stolen a briefcase from his car. Vincent's stepfather, Ron Baab, heads a crime family and tries to buy everyone off with both money and veiled threats. There is little solid evidence and the case relies primarily on Graham's girlfriend who has also been threatened. In Chambers meanwhile, Aldermarten is anxiously awaiting the results of his application to join an exclusive men's club to which Peter Foxcott is a member.

6. "In God We Trust" (14 April 1997)

    Kavanagh finds himself in Florida assisting his one-time pupil Julia Piper in preparing an appeal for an inmate who is on death row and awaiting execution in the electric chair. It is apparent that his original defence was badly handled from the start. Many facts were left unchallenged by the defence and no mitigation was offered at the sentencing stage despite his limited emotional development and abuse-laden upbringing. When Julia goes into premature labour, Kavanagh finds himself actually pleading the case and uncovering the true nature of what happened. At home meanwhile, Lizzie Kavanagh learns some distressing news from her doctors but waits until her husband's return to tell him.

Series 4

1. "Memento Mori" (17 March 1998)

    Following Lizzie's death Kavanagh takes on the case of a doctor, Felix Crawley, charged with killing his depressive and unfaithful wife Ann with an overdose of lithium. The doctor claims he has treated Ann in secret because of the shame of her disorder and the death was accidental. Kavanagh takes on prosecution witnesses, including Ann's lover and her young niece, whose advances Felix spurned, and, as the case draws to its verdict, comes to appreciate that he is identifying with his bereaved client.

2. "Care in the Community" (24 March 1998)

    Kavanagh and chambers head Peter Foxcott go to Kavanagh's home town, Bolton, where Kavanagh is defending Debbie Sattenthwaite and Mark Holmes, charged with killing their fourteen month old daughter. Unfortunately the couple's evidence suddenly starts to clash as Mark changes his story and Foxcott is shocked at the way Kavanagh goes for Debbie, requiring his intervention to assist his colleague.

3. "Briefs Trooping Gaily" (31 March 1998)

    Kavanagh, who is still mourning his wife's death, has to defend a woman charged with killing her abusive husband. Despite having a good case for manslaughter, she seems determined to plead guilty to murder. Meanwhile Jeremy is torn between the demands of his lead role in a Gilbert & Sullivan production, and a charge of professional misconduct for looking at a defence brief.

4. "Bearing Witness" (7 April 1998)

    Kavanagh's personal views and professional pride clash when his clerk Tom asks him to represent Tom's former girlfriend Susannah Emmott. After they split she was briefly married to a Jehovah's Witness whose beliefs she took on before he left her and the faith. She has a son, Luke, aged thirteen, whose father knows nothing of him and who needs a life-saving blood transfusion, which is against Susannah's religious beliefs. Kavanagh may find himself on the other side of the courtroom. Jeremy gets himself involved with a group of tree-huggers out to save local woodlands.

5. "Innocency of Life" (14 April 1998)

    Kavanagh is asked by the Bishop of Norfolk to defend a young vicar in an ecclesiastial court. Ian Winfarthing has been accused by pub landlady Anne Murchison of sexual harassment. But when Anne is charged with killing her drunken, bullying husband, Tom, accounts of what has been goining on in the small town begin to change. Jeremy dates a glamorous aristocrat, throwing her over for his career's sake when she tells him she is pregnant, and later finding he has dumped a millionairess. Kate sits finals at Cambridge.

6. "Dead Reckoning" (21 April 1998)

    Kavanagh goes to Yorkshire fishing port Stainmouth to prosecute Roy Lawrence for negligence after his apparently unseaworthy trawler sank, claiming five lives including Roy's son Paul. The defence claims that a submarine collided with the boat, a claim that becomes more and more likely. Roy is popular in the bereaved community and even Emma, Kavanagh's junior, feels sorry for him, but Kavanagh believes Roy had his own agenda and is not the philanthropist he seems. He also averts a chambers crisis by dissuading Tom from leaving.

Series 5

1. "Previous Convictions" (8 March 1999)

    A RAF Jet Provost trainer crashes into a crowded moto-cross event killing 22 people. One of these is a friend of Kavanagh's son. The RAF Corporal responsible for maintenance commits suicide, pinning the blame at his lover, Charlotte Sinclair (Anna Ryan). She is tried for theft and conspiracy to murder. Sabotage or human error? Kavanagh has to defend her and uncover documents initially denied to the Court. The episode ends with a magic trick and poetry recitation at a celebratory dinner at the Middle Temple.

2. "The More Loving One" (15 March 1999)

    In London, a house explodes killing Annie, a heroin-addict. Her boyfriend Michael, a former addict and convicted arsonist, is looking through the letter-box at the same time smoking a cigarette. He tells the first two people he sees “I killed her.” Gas leak or murder? Kavanagh has to defend him. Elsewhere Miss Miller is sent to Romford defending a pit bull terrier, before returning to London to be Kavanagh’s Junior in the murder case. Aldermarten has to take over. Next thing the knows he’s buying a third of a grey-hound and every-one goes to see it race.

3. "Time Of Need" (22 March 1999)

    A Junior Home Officer Minister (Penelope Wilton) is found innocent of sleeping with a 15-year-old boy, 16 years ago in Hastings. But she is still sacked from the Government. Kavanagh leads her suing the Police for compensation, on the grounds of malicious prosecution.

4. "End Games" (29 March 1999)

    In November 1985, a robbery at Turnbrook Services goes wrong and a pregnant teacher and young boy are killed. The following year, three men are sentenced to Life Imprisonment, with a minimum of between 15 and 23 years in jail. Kavanagh was a Junior for the flawed Defence. The firer of the final shot commits suicide in 1992 leaving a note admitting one of the men was innocent. Hunger strikes and petitions to Home Secretaries follow. Finally, 12 years after the initial murder, Kavanagh and Miss Miller act for one of the men, Cracken, at his appeal. Aldermarten will defend the other. Peter Foxcott (Oliver Ford Davies) decides to retire after a health scare. Kavanagh is offered the job of Head of Chambers at Riverside Court. Afterwards, Kavanagh and Eleanor go for a week-end in “raffish” Brighton, but decide to part as friends as she is to become a Prosecutor for the International War Crimes Tribunal for Yugoslavia in the Hague.

Series 6

1. "The End of Law" (two-hour special episode; 25 April 2001)

    Kavanagh is acting as a Recorder at Southwark Crown Court. Lord Cranston (Nicholas Le Prevost) pops in for a conversation during a trial for shop-lifting. Would he like to become a Judge? He asks Foxcott and his daughter for advice.

    Elsewhere, Aldermarten is prosecuting Harry Hatton (Robert Pickavance) for the murder of Katya Zimanyi (Rachel Woolrich), a Hungarian escort in the Mortimer Hotel. The defendant is served by Miss Swithen (Samantha Bond), a Solicitor Advocate. After losing the trial she asks Kavanagh for help with the appeal, but passes out after a diabetic attack. But Lord Cranston asks him not to get too involved – so of course he takes on the appeal. Soon a mis-carriage of justice starts to look like a state cover-up involving the intelligence community. Kavanagh gets given the alternatives of the appeal or being sworn in as a Judge.
Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
Dan Tanna Spenser
King of the Private Eyes
Administrator
Commander
***
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 43334


TV-Serien-Junkie


WWW
« Antworten #2 am: 03. Dezember 2013, 22:49:40 »

Kannte ich bislang noch nicht...sieht recht interessant aus Happy
Gespeichert

giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #3 am: 13. August 2014, 15:40:13 »

Ich habe mir die Box jetzt gekauft und genieße jeden Abend eine Episode.
Aussergewöhnlich ist, dass Thaw hier einmal einen verträglichen und unkomplizierten Charakter spielt. Wahrscheinlich wollte er nicht das Rampenlicht verlassen, ohne seinem Publikum auch noch den "normalen" John Thaw gezeigt zu haben.  Grinsen

Wie immer fasziniert mich auch in dieser Serie sein unverwechselbares, kristallklares Englisch. Niemand konnte diese Sprache so ausdrucksstark anlegen wie er.
Peter O'Toole sagte, Thaw könne überzeugend Proleten spielen, weil er aus einfachen Verhältnissen kam. Trotzdem war seine Ausdrucksweise besser als bei den meisten Shakespeare Schauspielern.

Ich selbst versuche immer, mir beim Englisch Reden seine Redewendungen und Betonungen anzueignen. Und vergesse dann auch nie zu sagen, dass mein Englischlehrer John Thaw war  Grinsen

@wbohm: Wenn du die altmodischen englischen Gerichtstraditionen so magst, musst du dir unbedingt mal "Rumpole Of The Bailey" ansehen!
Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« Antworten #4 am: 13. August 2014, 17:48:09 »

Ich habe mir die Box jetzt gekauft und genieße jeden Abend eine Episode.

 Freuen  Geniessen ist das richtige Wort für eine Serie mit John Thaw. Freut mich, dass dir die Serie auch so gut gefällt wie mir


Zitat
@wbohm: Wenn du die altmodischen englischen Gerichtstraditionen so magst, musst du dir unbedingt mal "Rumpole Of The Bailey" ansehen!

Ich habe die Komplettbox von Rumpole, die gibt es ja mittlerweile für wenig Geld zu kaufen. Alle 7 Staffeln plus Rumpole's Return.Toprolle für Leo McKern.

Kennst du schon die von mir oben genannte Serie "Judge John Deed" mit Martin Shaw? Kann ich dir auch wärmstens empfehlen, da habe ich auch alle Staffeln (komischerweise hat die BBC 2 Folgen nicht auf den DVD's drauf. Da war Judge Deed zum Internationalen Gerichtshof abkommandiert. Keine Ahnung, warum man die dann weggelassen hat)
Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
Jesse
Chef Moderator
Corporal Grade 1
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 4488




« Antworten #5 am: 14. August 2014, 09:22:28 »

Sehr schade, dass es keine synchronisierte Fassung in deutsch gibt. Leider sind meine Sprachkenntnisse nicht gut genug, um mehrere Staffeln wirklich entspannt zu genießen. Außerdem würden mir zu viele Feinheiten entgehen...  Traurig
Gespeichert

giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #6 am: 14. August 2014, 10:12:47 »

Sehr schade, dass es keine synchronisierte Fassung in deutsch gibt. Leider sind meine Sprachkenntnisse nicht gut genug, um mehrere Staffeln wirklich entspannt zu genießen. Außerdem würden mir zu viele Feinheiten entgehen...  Traurig
Auch bei der deutschen Übersetzung gehen oft wichtige Feinheiten verloren.
Ich finde es schade, dass sowohl englische als auch französische Produktionsfirmen es nicht für nötig halten, wenigstens Untertitel in anderen Sprachen anzubieten. Das ist heutzutage richtig rückständig! Bei deutschen DVDs hat man immer eine große Auswahl von Sprachen dabei.
Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #7 am: 14. August 2014, 10:19:16 »

Kennst du schon die von mir oben genannte Serie "Judge John Deed" mit Martin Shaw? Kann ich dir auch wärmstens empfehlen, da habe ich auch alle Staffeln (komischerweise hat die BBC 2 Folgen nicht auf den DVD's drauf. Da war Judge Deed zum Internationalen Gerichtshof abkommandiert. Keine Ahnung, warum man die dann weggelassen hat)
Die muss ich mir wohl noch vornehmen. Bin aber momentan nicht mal mit der George Gently Serie durch.

Wahrscheinlich war es für die Briten nicht tragbar, dass die Geschichte von der Insel auf den Kontinent verlegt wurde. Das ist ja auch wirklich shocking indeed!   totlachen
Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
Dan Tanna Spenser
King of the Private Eyes
Administrator
Commander
***
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 43334


TV-Serien-Junkie


WWW
« Antworten #8 am: 14. August 2014, 12:12:10 »

Von "Judge John Deed" habe ich auch einige Folgen in englisch, ist im deutschen TV ja leider nie gezeigt wurden...
Gespeichert

giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #9 am: 29. August 2014, 11:01:12 »

Habe mich schon in die Serie verliebt. Die meisten Fälle sind wirklich spannend bis zuletzt, weil doch immer noch eine unerwartete Wendung kommt.
Absolut witzig sind aber die Geschichten, die sich in der Gemeinschaftskanzlei abspielen. Und hier fällt mir ein Schauspieler auf, der mir mehr und mehr genial vorkommt: Nicolas Jones, der den Jeremy Aldermarten spielt.
Er ist sozusagen der "Dumme" in der Serie, ein zwar guter, aber eitler, eingebildeter und chauvinistischer Anwalt, der ständig vergeblich an seiner Karriere bastelt. Die Rolle allein gibt schon allerhand her, aber Nicolas Jones spielt so fantastisch (mit sehr zurückhaltender Mimik und unheimlich britisch), dass ich mir manche lustigen Szenen zwei mal ansehen muss!

Einen richtigen Lachanfall habe ich bekommen, als Kavanagh seinen "Intimfeind" Aldermarten wegen eines Dienstvergehens verteidigt und klar machen will, dass dieser ein geheimes Dokument ohne Brille gar nicht hätte lesen können. In der Verhandlung will er beweisen, dass Aldermarten keine Brille trug:

"Sie sind eitel."
"Wie bitte?"
"Sie sind eitel!"
"Nicht dass ich wüsste!"
"Ich kann Zeugen dafür aufbringen."
"Nur wenige Leute würden finden, dass ich eitel bin."
"Genaugenommen finden alle Leute, dass Sie eitel sind." (alle Anwesenden grinsen)
Kavanagh rettet ihm die Karriere indem er ihn öffentlich vorführt  totlachen totlachen totlachen
« Letzte Änderung: 29. August 2014, 11:14:18 von giorgio » Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« Antworten #10 am: 29. August 2014, 11:25:29 »

Übrigens gibt es mit der Serie "Silk" jetzt eine ähnlich gelagerte Serie von der BBC. In der Hauptrolle Maxine Peake und Rupert Penry Jones, die beide sich als Kronanwälte der Kanzlei bewerben, aber es darf nur einer QC werden. Rupert Penry Jones, den ich immer sehr gern sehe, spielt hier ein richtiges "A....loch"  wird auch nur "Oberstecher" genannt von den Gehilfen in der Kanzlei (Natalie Dormer fällt natürlich auch auf ihn rein )

Hmm, habe ich schon wieder eine britische Gerichtsserie vorgestellt. Ich kann's einfach nicht lassen  totlachen  Aber wie gesagt, ich liebe diese britischen Anwaltserien mit ihren Perücken vor Gericht


edit: Ups, hier habe ich anstatt auf zitieren wohl versehentlich auf editieren geklickt und jetzt ist mein alter Text zu Nicholas Jones und seiner "Jagd nach der Silk-Robe der Kronanwälte" gelöscht worden  sauer
« Letzte Änderung: 31. August 2014, 19:00:33 von wbohm » Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« Antworten #11 am: 31. August 2014, 18:56:22 »

Noch eine kleine Anmerkung zu Silk: Irgendwie kam mir der eine Lordrichter da doch sehr bekannt vor. Und richtig, es ist der oben angesprochene Nicholas Jones. Habe ihn nicht gleich erkannt, da ja mittlerweile doch älter geworden und dann natürlich mit Perücke.

Mit der Serie ist der BBC auf jeden Fall wieder was Gutes gelungen (wie eigentlich immer). Habe jetzt alle bisherigen 3 Staffeln à 6 Folgen durch. Und die ersten beiden Staffeln liefen sogar schon in Deutschland auf ZDFneo.


« Letzte Änderung: 31. August 2014, 18:59:20 von wbohm » Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #12 am: 01. September 2014, 11:42:43 »

Noch eine kleine Anmerkung zu Silk: Irgendwie kam mir der eine Lordrichter da doch sehr bekannt vor. Und richtig, es ist der oben angesprochene Nicholas Jones. Habe ihn nicht gleich erkannt, da ja mittlerweile doch älter geworden und dann natürlich mit Perücke.
Ich habe gelesen, dass er in "The Strauss Family" sogar den Kaiser Franz Joseph gespielt hat  totlachen Würde ich gerne mal sehen!

In Kavanagh lerne ich auf jeden Fall wieder nützliche neue Redewendungen. Die Sprache ist einfach so schön, wenn man sie altmodisch anwendet.
Ganz neu war für mich, wie sich die gegnerischen Anwälte vor Gericht offiziell anreden, mit: "My learned friend" (das zweite "e" wird ausgesprochen). Das ist sicher ganz altertümlich!  Freuen
Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
wbohm
Chef Moderator
Master Trooper
****
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 6543


#DontKillSeanBean



« Antworten #13 am: 01. September 2014, 12:43:52 »

In Kavanagh lerne ich auf jeden Fall wieder nützliche neue Redewendungen. Die Sprache ist einfach so schön, wenn man sie altmodisch anwendet.
Ganz neu war für mich, wie sich die gegnerischen Anwälte vor Gericht offiziell anreden, mit: "My learned friend" (das zweite "e" wird ausgesprochen). Das ist sicher ganz altertümlich!  Freuen

Schön zu lesen, dass das noch jemand genauso sieht wie ich. Auch ich liebe das. Wie ich überhaupt das "reine Englisch" und seine manchmal "gestelzte" Ausdrucksweise mehr liebe als das "american englisch".

Ja, dieses "my learned friend" ist einfach so herrlich altmodisch. Übrigens reden sich nur die "Barristers" so an, also die Anwälte, die vor Gericht auftreten. Dann gibt es ja noch die "Solicitors", also die beratenden Anwälte. Ein Barrister redet einen Solicitor aber nur mit "my friend" an. Das "learnded" wird da weggelassen.
Gespeichert

Who are you? .... I am the Doctor!
Doctor...., who? ..... Exactly!
giorgio
Officer
*
Offline Offline

Geschlecht: Männlich
Beiträge: 918


We're the Sweeney, son - you're nicked!




« Antworten #14 am: 15. September 2014, 10:50:33 »

Für die Serie haben sie sich ein monumentales Ende ausgedacht! Eine Gerichtsserie endet als fatalistische Abrechnung mit dem Britischen Rechtssystem!
Spoiler  :
Kahanagh verliert sein Vertrauen in die Justiz und lehnt die Ernennung zum Richter ab.
Es gelingt ihm, einen Unschuldigen, der aus Staatsraison "verheizt" wird, vor dem Gefängnis zu bewahren, aber er muss einsehen, dass die Geheimdienste das Recht beugen können, wie es ihnen beliebt.
Der Satz, der die ganze Gerichtsserie abschließt, spricht Bände: Aldermarten will Kavanagh gratulieren, weil dieser den Prozess gewonnen hat, aber Kavanagh hat gerade seine Ideale verloren. So fährt er Aldermarten zornig an: "Balls! Neither of us did win!" - Ende der Serie. Ich bin noch eine Weile sprachlos dagesessen.  Betenn / Anbeten
« Letzte Änderung: 15. September 2014, 12:24:42 von Dan Tanna » Gespeichert

I'll never make chief inspector - but I am still a bloody good inspector! (Regan)

Light Beer is an invention of the prince of darkness (Morse)
Seiten: [1] 2
  Drucken  
 
Gehe zu:  


Meine anderen Foren und Homepages

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006, Simple Machines LLC Prüfe XHTML 1.0 Prüfe CSS