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Autor Thema: Richard Hatch Interview (engl.)  (Gelesen 1219 mal)
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« am: 17. Oktober 2009, 16:55:54 »

 Freuen Hab das Interview wieder gefunden! Freuen Zwar an einer anderen Stelle als damals,aber es ist es! Grinsen

Hier der URL:

http://www.hollywoodnorthreport.com/documents/bghatch1.php

Es ist leider nicht das ganze Interview,denn das war im Original 5 Seiten lang,aber es beinhaltet genau das,was für uns hier besonders interessant ist!
« Letzte Änderung: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:29:23 von Theo Kojak » Gespeichert

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« Antworten #1 am: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:29:02 »

Freuen Genial!!!!! Freuen

Ich kopiere das Interview mal ab, weil teilweise schon die Bilder raus sin, ists ja möglich, dass die seite bald ganz weg ist.


Finding the Passion

A Conversation with Richard Hatch

By Robert Falconer, HNR Senior Editor


Many of us remember November 22, 1963 as a date in history that forever changed America. It was also a date that forever changed the life of Richard Hatch, for it marked the beginning of a personal journey that would lead him to a career in the performing arts, and a starring role in one of science fiction’s most enduring series.

From fledgling actor, to teen heartthrob, to science fiction icon, to writer/producer/director and lecturer, Richard remains first and foremost a gentleman; genuine and unaffected.
 

As anyone reading this article probably already knows, over the past several years Richard has also been at the epicenter of the Battlestar Galactica revival attempt, a double-edged sword that has proven to be a source of both frustration and inspiration to him.In this exclusive, in-depth interview, I talked with him about acting, his formative roles, working on the original Battlestar Galactica, and sundry other entertainment industry topics. I also asked Richard if he would entertain the notion of appearing in the new Battlestar Galactica series, were the role sufficiently engaging. His response just may surprise you.

Robert: Tell us about the early days of your acting career.

Richard Hatch: Acting to me was always an amazing art, but I never, ever in a million years thought that I could be an actor or make a living as an actor. I kind of fell into it—I was going to Harbor Junior College, studying liberal arts, not knowing what I really wanted to do, except thinking maybe about being an architect.

I got into an oral interpretation class that I was forced to take because the other English electives were already filled up and I had to take it if I wanted to qualify for Track in the spring—track was a sport that I was very involved in…I wanted to go to the Olympics as a pole-vaulter. I have to tell you that the first day of class I freaked out wondering how I was going to pass this class when it meant getting up in front of people and having to read material. The grade was based on your performance. Normally, I would mumble through my readings and look down, not making any eye contact. Consequently, I was failing half the course.

Then, in November 1963, President Kennedy was assassinated. I happened to read an article in the newspaper about it that literally made me cry. The teacher asked us to bring in articles the following week and read them, so I decided to bring in this particular article that had moved me so deeply. Of course, everybody in the class looked away in boredom thinking, “Oh no, here comes Richard Hatch again.”

The thing I discovered was that as I began to read the article I got so involved in it that I forgot myself. And I realized that all of a sudden—without even trying—I was making eye contact with people. Something took over inside of me and this magical “thing” happened and I blew away everybody in the class. I really enjoyed the experience I had reading that material. At the end of the day people came up to me and said, “God, you should be an actor!” and I said, “Thank you very much, but I don’t think I could do that.” But I did find that when I read something of meaning to me that it unlocked my heart and spirit and allowed me to move beyond my self-consciousness, fear and insecurity.

Robert: Clearly it was a defining moment for you.

Richard Hatch: Yes, it was. I think that was the beginning of laying seeds that later on came into play when a good friend of mine, Elliot Mintz—who once served as a publicist for Yoko Ono and John Lennon, and later as a PR director for Don Johnson—said, “You know, you ought to go to this acting class.” I said, “What acting class is that?” He said, “The Eric Morris Actor’s Workshop.” I said, “Listen, I don’t think I can act…I don’t even know what it is, and the whole idea terrifies me.” But he said, “No, I think this would really be helpful for you.” So, in 1966 I got the courage to go, and I remember the sign over the door said: “No Acting Please.” I thought that was an interesting sign to be on the door of an acting class. Nevertheless, as I went into the class, I realized it was more than just an acting class; it was a class in life…a class in learning how to be yourself. It was based on Stanislavsky and the Method, but it led you to get more honestly in touch with yourself first; learn how to be vulnerable—then from this place of vulnerability you would make creative decisions, judgments and acting choices that would finally lead you to creating characters. As our teacher said: “Act less and experience more.”

I didn’t think of it as an acting class so much as a class where I could overcome my crippling shyness—never thinking that it would lead to an acting career. At that time, Jack Nicholson was stopping by, Sue Lyon—who played the original Lolita—and her boyfriend, Hampton Fancher—who wrote Blade Runner—were also hanging out at that class. I was the lone surfer guy, going to college…working as a lifeguard.Eventually, after about a year, I did a play, This Property is Condemned. During one scene, I was able to connect so fully to the other actor on stage, that I again forgot myself and got into this creative flow where you lose sight of where you are and you just get into the zone. It’s what every artist lives for. You go beyond your limitations, you go beyond what is possible, and you have this feeling of infinity. I never felt freer or more uninhibited.

Robert: Did you have any mentors or role models when you first began acting?

Richard Hatch: No. Because to tell you the truth, even from the beginning with the acting, it never seemed real to me. I used acting as a method to grow as a human being and overcome my inhibitions. In the class people said, “You should go out and audition.” I didn’t quite take it seriously, but slowly I got various jobs: working as a production assistant, doing extra work on a couple of soaps, etc. Eventually, I met some producers and directors who steered me to an agent, and this agent began sending me out on modeling and commercial gigs for products like Maybelline and Coca-Cola.

Robert: Did you continue with live theater during this period?

Richard Hatch: Yes. I moved into a repertory theater group where I was doing one-act plays and poetry readings. The group eventually moved to New York in a caravan of cars. We lived in an empty ballet studio for about three months, doing plays and one-act readings, until eventually they left to go to Rome. I ended up staying because I had friends there, and I thought, “Hey, this is New York,” and when you start studying acting you think of New York, since so many plays are written about the city. I lived in one room with no bathroom or kitchen, and studied with an acting teacher named George Morrison.

Robert: What was your first regular television role?

Richard Hatch: Eventually, I read for a new daytime drama called All My Children, which was my first major role. I played Philip Brent, and along with Susan Lucci and Karen Gorney—the latter who actually went on to star with John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever—the three of us were the original children in All My Children.

It was at that time that I realized that maybe I could make a living as an actor. It kind of blew me away, because I never thought of myself as somebody who would actually be on television or make money at it. And when I started getting recognized for All My Children it was an amazing experience. I had originally looked at acting as a healing modality, and it just happened to turn into something else.

 
Robert: What do you find the most difficult or challenging part of the acting process?

Richard Hatch: The most challenging things in acting for me personally are learning how to get in touch with your emotions and feelings…how to use your imagination to make choices…exploring hypothetical possibilities…learning how to step into a character and get into the body language…and learning to empathetically move through a character’s life and back story.

Robert: That’s a lot of creative thought processes to juggle at one time.

Richard Hatch: It can be. And in this industry, they don’t make it easy for you to do your best work, unfortunately. I’ve seen better performances in acting classes than I’ve ever seen in movies. Some of the most talented, gifted actors I know do not audition well. It’s one thing to be in an acting class where everybody supports you and creates an optimum working environment. But when you walk into an audition, you get ten, twenty people in there you don’t know—strangers—and you’ve got two minutes to shine, and it’s at that moment that you have to find a way to get to your best performance. You really have to learn how to audition well.

The same goes for working in front of a camera. It can be in the middle of the night or three in the morning, they’ll spend hours setting up, and then all of a sudden they say “It’s time,” and you’ve got to walk in front of that camera and make choices and decisions and jump into that reality and give your best performance. Learning how to do it when that camera rolls is the hardest part. You have to learn how to focus, concentrate and yet relax at the same time.

Robert: Many stage-trained actors remark at how they relish live theater by comparison, as it offers not only audience feedback, but also a linear progression of the story without constant retakes.

Richard Hatch: Absolutely. In fact, it’s amazing to me that great performances ever get done in front of a camera. It’s much easier when you’re on stage and you get into the flow of the piece. The continuity helps you to get more mentally, emotionally and spiritually connected to the part.

« Letzte Änderung: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:31:22 von Theo Kojak » Gespeichert

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« Antworten #2 am: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:29:44 »

Robert: You had the opportunity to work closely with a number of talented veteran actors prior to Battlestar Galactica, including Jack Lord, Karl Malden and Michael Douglas. Tell us a little about that.

Richard Hatch: Well, I remember I met Jack Lord at a premiere of one of his movies before I ever got in the business. It was when he was doing his short-lived series, Stoney Burke. He walked away from the crowd and sat down next to me. He was just trying to get away from everybody. He said hello, and I remember him being very gracious and very warm. At the time I didn’t know who he was until he introduced himself as the star of the movie. He was very down to earth, very real, and the interesting thing is that later on I did several episodes of Hawaii Five-O, and often when Jack directed an episode, he would bring me over. I never got to know him too well, but he was always friendly and supportive—really a gentleman—and I never forgot that because I was a young actor; terrified with it all being so new to me. The funny part is I heard such horrible stories about him from other people, and yet my experience with him was that he was an incredible human being.

Karl Malden was like your loving, but stern grandfather; very demanding but very professional. He expected the best out of everybody, he worked very hard, he was always on his mark and always prepared. He set the tone, set the bar, but he was very strict about it. He wasn’t very forgiving. The hard part for me was that he had worked with Michael Douglas on The Streets of San Francisco for four or five years and Michael was like family to him.

Michael Douglas took me to lunch when we did the two-hour Streets of San Francisco episode where I come in. He was the nicest, laid-back, warm guy. He really helped me and was very supportive. I can’t say enough about Michael. He reached out and extended himself; helped me to get through that first episode. I was stepping into a prime-time series for the first time and all of it was pretty terrifying, I have to admit. And yet, it was a great opportunity.

Robert: Can you tell us how you landed the role of Inspector Dan Robbins on The Streets of San Francisco, and how your character differed from Michael’s?

Richard Hatch: I did a guest-starring role on another Quinn Martin show, Cannon, in which I played opposite Joan Fontaine, as her son. I remember Quinn Martin was really impressed with my performance, and without my ever having to read, when Buddy Ebson needed a new sidekick on Barnaby Jones, Quinn brought me in and offered me the role. I actually turned it down, because to tell you the truth—in my life I never turned anything down out of ego—I was always looking for a role that I could sink my teeth into as an actor…something that would inspire me, and I didn’t think that Barnaby Jones would work for me.

When they offered me the role on Streets—again, without reading—I again was going to turn it down because I thought Michael and Karl were wonderful together and I didn’t see how I could ever replace Michael. I also didn’t think it was a part where I would get a chance to do much as an actor. It seemed to be more of a guest-star show, and I honestly wanted to play more challenging roles. I used to love character roles much more than leading-man roles, which always seemed to be quite bland.

I was eventually talked into it by Quinn Martin and my agent, who said it would be a good career move for me and that it would put me in a position to get the kinds of roles that I really wanted to do. They told me the show was split up three ways: a third were guest-star roles, a third were Karl’s role, and then a third would be episodes that would focus on my character.

Because of the way Michael’s character was written, they wanted to do something totally opposite, so they made my character—and they used a little of my own life in this—a health food guy. He drank carrot juice instead of coffee. It was kind of funny dealing with Karl’s character like that…instead of going and getting some coffee and a hot dog, it was like: “Oh, there’s the health food store. Let’s go get a carrot juice with some wheat grass.”

Robert: Which of course drove Karl’s character crazy.

Richard Hatch: Which of course drove Karl’s character crazy, you’re right. They were always looking for anything that would add fun and value to the relationship.

Robert: You had played a number of likeable, but often roguish characters earlier in your television career. Did you do any sort of research in preparation for playing a police officer?

Richard Hatch: I did, actually. But the biggest lesson I learned on the set was once when I ran to help Karl arrest a guy, and then I threw the guy down in the alleyway to cuff him. After about three takes the director came over to me and said, “Richard, let me talk to you for a moment.” And I said, “Yeah, yeah, what’s the problem?” And he said, “Ya know, we already know you’re a cop…play the human being.” And what he meant was that I had watched so many cop shows that unwittingly I had picked up many clichés about what cops are supposed to be like, and unconsciously I was repeating all of those clichés, when all he wanted me to do was let that all go and let the human being come through.

Robert: How was the off-screen chemistry between you and Karl Malden? Did he ever give you any specific acting advice that sticks out in your mind?

Richard Hatch: You know, the way that I came in, in that fifth year, it was very difficult. I was replacing Michael Douglas…the show was having problems because of the violence codes on TV…they were putting our show on different nights; moving it around. So there was a lot of stress on the sets because of all the changes. It was a difficult time. That year was a shakedown cruise, and I was struggling just to get through the experience, to stay focused, and to try and do my best work, even though I was terrified of failing—because trying to replace someone on a show is much worse than originating a new character.

Karl was gracious; he was a gentleman and a professional, but he wasn’t particularly warm. I never really got any acting tips, as it were, from him, because we never really had a chance in that first year together to get to know each other personally. I wish we could have, but the problem was that he had things to do, and I was dealing with being on my first prime-time series. I was having to make multiple trips down to LA, my agent was setting up all kinds of other meetings; trying to take advantage of the opportunity. I was also traveling; doing PR and talk shows. And to tell you the truth, I had never done all of that before. I came from a little hut in Beverly Glenn, with no money, no furniture, deeply in debt…and within five minutes I was up in San Francisco in a mansion with a driver and a car, being in a major TV series, having all this press coverage and attention, and I have to tell you it was incredibly overwhelming.

Robert: After The Streets of San Francisco ended, there was only about a year or so before Battlestar Galactica began production. Can you tell us what you were doing during the interim?

Richard Hatch: I did Deadman’s Curve, an MOW in which I played Jan Berry, based upon the true-life story of the ‘60s rock stars, Jan & Dean. Jan Berry had been in a critical automobile accident and suffered from aphasia [brain damage].

Robert: Were you a science fiction fan when you were growing up?

Richard Hatch: I used to get lost in science fiction books from the time I was in seventh grade. Getting through class was miserable for me. The teacher would keep coming over and noticing that I wasn’t paying attention to class because I would be reading science fiction books. Something about these novels led me into a world where it wasn’t just fantasy, but it touched a deeper part of my own being.

I think great science fiction writers are visionary and they have incredible imaginations. They seem to tap into universal truths that in many cases have been prophetic in the world. I found the combination of great story telling, incredible characters, and looking into future possibilities really blew me away.

Robert: Do you recall having any favorite authors at that time?

Richard Hatch: I remember reading Philip Wylie and a book called The Disappearance. It explored what would happen if all the women in the world disappeared: How the world would fall apart, or not fall apart. What would happen to the sociological, philosophical, psychological, spiritual mindset of people? The second half of the book dealt with what happens when all the men disappear and only women were left: How society breaks down. At the end of the book, both the men and women come back together again with a deeper understanding and appreciation of one another.

Robert: Did you watch any science fiction television series around this same time?

Richard Hatch: The Twilight Zone was my favorite show back then. I actually fell in love with Star Trek in reruns when I was doing All My Children.

Robert: What was your reaction when you first saw the original Star Wars?

Richard Hatch: I saw it at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. I couldn’t believe it; it just blew me away. I remember coming out of the theater like a child, walking around in a daze. It was just absolutely extraordinary.

Robert: Originally, you turned Battlestar Galactica down. How did it come to be offered to you, and what ultimately convinced you to do it?

Richard Hatch: When they first announced Battlestar—and the opportunity to audition came up—I thought, “Oh, it’s just going to be a rip-off of Star Wars for television…probably far less quality.” That was honestly my first thought. And secondly, while I loved science fiction, I thought it was going to be very action-based, and I wanted to do roles that would push the limit and challenge me as a human being. And I didn’t think I’d get a chance to do that on this show. So I chose not to audition. Six months later, they’d already seen everybody in town and couldn’t find the actor they were looking for. Glen Larson had seen me play a coach in an MOW, Class of ’65, and essentially called up my agent and said, “I want to have a meeting.”

He took me out to dinner and proceeded to tell me about the script; that it was actually going to be not just action oriented, but very character oriented. He told me that it was going to be a combination of Family—which was a very successful, Emmy-winning show at that time—and Wagon Train.

Once I read the script and saw Ralph McQuarrie’s artwork, immediately a big part of me wanted to do it. I realized that, number one, it was not a rip off of Star Wars, it was a totally different story; and number two, if the scope of the artwork was where they were going with it, it would be amazing. The little kid in me thought, “Oh my god, I have got to be in this.”

Yet still, the actor in me really wanted to be playing more challenging character roles. Honestly, I was split. Ultimately I told my agent, “Look, it’s up to god. Negotiate…go for it…and if it’s meant to be, it’s meant to me…if it’s not, it’s not.” I was honestly willing to lose it—again, not out of ego—but because I didn’t know if this was going to be the right thing for me as an actor.

Robert: And I understand you didn’t find out until, literally, the eleventh hour.

Richard Hatch: They negotiated until the very last minute. In fact, they had already begun filming. I got signed on a Friday—within an hour I was over at the studio getting fitted for wardrobe, then running over to film my scene. I didn't even have time to study the lines. I had to study them on the way to the set.
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« Antworten #3 am: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:30:13 »

Robert: You must have been awestruck when you first saw the sets, particularly the bridge set.

Richard Hatch: Oh, yeah, when I walked onto the sets and looked around, it hit me…this is a big deal. I had no idea how big of a deal it was until that moment. In fact, I remember nobody broke for lunch that first day. We all stayed on the bridge set and played these new computer games that hadn’t gone out to the public yet. The set used real computers, and the suppliers brought over the games. It was quite amazing at the time.

Robert: Tell us a little about the production of the original Galactica. I understand it was a very difficult shoot, which frequently ran behind schedule due to the inherent complexities of the production.

Richard Hatch: Due to the rigorous schedule, most of us were living in our motor homes on the back lot of Universal. It got to be like a family. We were cooking dinners for each other. When I had a date, or family and friends wanted to visit, we didn’t go out anywhere; we had to stay on the set because they never knew when they were going to need us. Once in a while you’d get to run home and get some new clothes.

We shot fifteen to eighteen hours a day, and before long we ended up filming seven days a week with no weekends off. Otherwise they couldn’t get the shows completed in time.

Robert: This must have been stressful.

Richard Hatch: I must say, that with such a large cast, being under such challenging conditions—with frequent all-night shoots, for example—nobody had an attitude or an ego, and it probably had as much to do with Lorne Greene as anything. Here was this wonderful star that everybody grew up with. He was the patriarch of the show, and he set the tone. He was such a humble human being, that nobody ever dared pull rank. He really brought everybody together. We’d all go to his house for different occasions and became an extended family as a result.

I don’t remember any significant fights or disagreements amongst the cast, even though we frequently weren’t getting enough sleep, or were getting scripts at the last second. It was crazy. It took sixteen to eighteen months to shoot one season, which is unheard of. But the struggle forged a sense of camaraderie, which I think is part of what made the show work.

Robert: Tell us more about acting with Lorne Greene. And did the relentless shooting schedule ever slow him down?

Richard Hatch: Lorne was unbelievably warm and gracious. He was so easy to talk to; he was like your father. Playing father and son was the easiest thing I’ve ever done because I felt like he was my father. I’ve never had such a wonderful relationship with a co-star in my career as I had with Lorne Greene.

He was still very energetic and very spry even in his sixties; a very hearty human being. I never saw him exhausted or even tired, frankly. He always seemed centered and fully present, and set an example to everybody.

Robert: Did you get a chance to preview the Galactica visual effects before the pilot was wrapped and in the can?

Richard Hatch: We didn’t get to see them till way towards the end. But I knew they were going to look good, because I was aware we had John Dykstra. I also recalled a conversation I’d had with Mark Hamill back when he guest-starred on The Streets of San Francisco. (I knew Mark when we were young actors; we had auditioned for things together.) When he was on-set we got to chatting, and he said that he had just worked on this little movie called Star Wars—before he’d seen the film or the special effects. So remembering that conversation, I already knew beforehand that what one might think of as a “little movie,” was not going to be a little movie at all.

Robert: Of all the characters you’ve played over the past 35 years, which was the most rewarding, and conversely, which was the most challenging?

Richard Hatch: I played a mentally retarded young man on Medical Center. That was frankly one of the best roles I’ve ever played. Again, playing Jan Berry on Deadman’s Curve was one of the most challenging parts I’ve played. There was also a lead role I had opposite Patty Duke in The Hitch-Hikers—an adaptation of a Eudora Welty short story—which was one of the most enjoyable parts I’ve done. But again, those were all tremendous character pieces.

Robert: In your estimation, from an acting standpoint, how has the business changed in the last 35 years?

Richard Hatch: When I got in this business, there were far fewer actors, it was much easier to get into SAG [Screen Actor’s Guild], and it was much easier to get an agent and audition. Believe it or not, when you guest-starred on a show twenty-five years ago, you actually made more money than you do today. You used to make between two and three thousand dollars back then if you were an unknown guesting on a show. Today, in the same situation, sometimes all you make is fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars unless you’re a big star from a series.

Today, there are ten times as many actors auditioning for the same role. Often they won’t even audition you until they’ve seen film on you—back then you could get an audition without it. Basically, there used to be more one-on-one contact between the actor and the casting director, producer and director. Now, you get submitted for a role, the casting assistants go through thousands of submissions, choose a few here and there…then they have the preliminary auditions with the casting director…then they set it up with the producer. Before you even get to the people who make the decision you must go through a long, tedious process.

Also, when I used to audition for series, instead of going into a room with forty or fifty executives—which is common today and can be terrifying for an actor—once they had decided on the top five or ten actors that they wanted to look at, they would actually get them together with a director, rehearse, and then go film a scene. Then they would edit the scene and show the film to the executives, as opposed to forcing the actor to appear in person to audition.

Robert: So it’s become more of a “system” now.

Richard Hatch: It’s become more of a factory, and as I mentioned earlier, the best actors often don’t audition well. That’s not to say that talent doesn’t get through, because there are some exceptionally talented people who do get through—and I honor those people. That’s why when I see a great performance I take my hat off because I know how difficult it was to actually get that kind of a performance on screen.
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« Antworten #4 am: 17. Oktober 2009, 17:30:31 »

Robert: With so much corporate input into studios and feature films, there seems to be a greater separation now between what we see on the big screen vs. what we see on the small screen. Would you agree?

Richard Hatch: Once upon a time, back when more artistically-minded executives were in charge, better movies got made that were story and character driven—as opposed to demographically or technology driven—and then as the large corporations took over, it became simply about business. Movies now have to be “events.” Therefore, in order to ensure success, there has to be a lot of sex, action, special effects or merchandise tie-ins. Everything has gotten so big that the wonderful roles that actors love to play have become relegated to television, where more story and character-driven pieces are being done.

On television, they don’t have to reach such an enormous audience. They’re actively looking for product due to the large numbers of cable and specialty channels catering to a variety of specific tastes and demographics. It’s no longer just ABC, CBS and NBC like it was forty years ago. It’s become a place where producers, writers and directors—who are looking to do something special—can have an opportunity to do so. And often, you end up with better roles for actors on television than in the movies. It’s definitely drawn the actor into the television arena.

Robert: Do you currently have any favorite television shows?

Richard Hatch: Ironically, I’ve stopped watching television, except for cable. I watched a few episodes of Smallville—I don’t watch it consistently—and I found it quite entertaining. I also watched OZ. I really enjoy the History Channel and the information channels, though. I love being plugged into the world and keeping up with what’s going on. But lately, I’m spending more of my time writing.

Robert: Speaking of writing, in the last several years you’ve moved into the realm of writing and producing, beginning of course with the Battlestar Galactica comics and novels, and then the Battlestar Galactica: The Second Coming trailer, which has often been credited with helping to galvanize interest in the Galactica franchise. Most recently, you’ve been developing your own project, The Great War of Magellan. The project trailer features a number of outstanding character actors familiar to science fiction viewers, such as J. G. Hertzler (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine), Jason Carter (Babylon 5), Richard Lynch (Star Trek: The Next Generation), Brad Dourif (The X-Files, Star Trek: Voyager) and Robin Atkin Downs (Babylon 5). Tell us a little about Magellan.

Richard Hatch: Well, after a lengthy struggle to resurrect Battlestar Galactica as a continuation of the original story and themes, two years ago I realized that Universal was going to go its own way with the property. Through the process of making The Second Coming trailer I realized that I loved writing, producing and directing. It inspired me to form my own company, MerlinQuest Entertainment, and to begin developing a new series, The Great War of Magellan.

Magellan follows a human evolution in the Magellanic Cloud. It’s very epic and theatrical in size and scope. It has the sweep, the characters, the relationships and the “quest” of stories akin to The Lord of the Rings. My challenge was how to create a futuristic venue where extraordinary characters are placed in extraordinarily challenging conditions, that still enables dramatic character relationships. There’s a lot of action, but it evolves out of character and plot. It’s designed to be an insightful exploration into human beings that live in a difficult time where everything in their lives is being challenged and called into question; where life and death and the struggle to survive are paramount. I also wanted to explore the great questions that humanity is always asking: Who are we? Where did we come from? Where are we going?

Robert: And I understand you’ve just had some exciting news in regards to Magellan.

Richard Hatch: I’m happy to say I just made a three-novel deal for Magellan. I’m writing the first novel now. I’m also moving forward with a comic book deal for it as we speak, and am meeting with a big game company in Germany to do a Magellan CD-Rom game.

Robert: At the end of the day, which hat do you prefer wearing: acting, directing, writing or producing?

Richard Hatch: What I learned is that writing is an amazing experience for me. It’s like painting; I get lost in realms of creativity and imagination. But whichever I’m doing, it’s all in a sense connected. Whether I’m behind the camera or in front of the camera, the relationships for me are very integrated, so in a sense I find them all a part of one hat—parts of a greater whole—and I can’t imagine doing one without the other. They’re all facets of my creative self.

Robert: Last question. The new Battlestar Galactica miniseries was very successful for the SCI-FI Channel, but continues to generate a lot of controversy amongst fandom. Now that you’ve had the opportunity to see it, is there any chance at all we might look forward to seeing you do a guest-starring role in the new series?

Richard Hatch: First of all, I wasn’t surprised by the large viewership. The studio had been saying for years that there weren’t enough fans out there. But after having traveled the world for the past seven years and doing conventions in front of tens of thousands of fans from the ages of twelve to eighty, I could readily see that this franchise had something that moved people in a way that very few shows do.

Hopefully, Ron Moore can cultivate these characters and relationships and create a compelling show that will slowly begin to build a new audience. The hardest thing about any new show is staying on long enough to attract an audience—great shows go off the air too soon. This is a totally different show than the first one in tone and spirit. The choice to reimagine alienated many fans of the original, so in a sense it needs to find its own audience. And that’s certainly possible, but again, I believe it’s going to take some time.

And even though I disagreed with the choice to reimagine, as opposed to continue—and find it somewhat painful to deal with—at the same time I understand Ron’s creative, artistic agenda to do something new, and appreciate the difficulties and challenges of writing any new series. With respect to the Galactica franchise, I think the success of this show helps everybody, and the failure of this show helps nobody.

To answer your question about appearing on the new series, I don’t want to do anything anymore in my life unless it’s something I can be proud of, that challenges me. If I’m offered a meaningful guest star role on the new Battlestar Galactica where I can play a part that will inspire me, and where I can do my best work…yes, I would love to do it! In fact, the producers and I are meeting about it now. But the important distinction here is that it’s a choice I’m making as an actor.

 

I’d like to thank Richard for taking the time to give us this rare and insightful interview. We hope to be talking with him again in the weeks and months ahead, as events in the Galactica universe—be they real, imagined or reimagined—continue to unfold.

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...Entzückend, Baby!

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« Antworten #5 am: 17. Oktober 2009, 18:49:18 »

Genial. Muss ich mir aber später durchlesen. Dafür fehlt mir die Zeit.. ... (ist ja gut.. ich komme!!! Mahlzeit!!)
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« Antworten #6 am: 21. Oktober 2009, 19:00:09 »

Genial, auf English ! I like reading anything on the shooting of The Streets of San Francisco. ich lese gern alles über die Drehung der Strassen von San Francisco ! 
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« Antworten #7 am: 28. Dezember 2009, 12:49:21 »

Für alle Strassen von San Francisco-Fans!!!
Schaut mal bei You Tube nach...
"The John Kerwin Show: Richard Hatch Interview"
Neben Kampfstern Galactica geht er auch kurz auf die Straßen von San Francisco, Karl und Michael ein...
Schaut mal rein!!!

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« Antworten #8 am: 28. Dezember 2009, 12:56:22 »

halt...
noch was gefunden!!!

"The Midnight Movie: Richard Hatch Interview" Richard erwähnt aber nur die Serie und Michael Douglas in einen Satz!!!

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« Antworten #9 am: 28. Dezember 2009, 21:19:44 »

Hier ist das Interview von youtube!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETyiFPtcWpA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETyiFPtcWpA</a>
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« Antworten #10 am: 28. Dezember 2009, 23:46:53 »

Etwas chaotisch.... wie alt ist das Interview???
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